In Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa or Oceania region? Want to improve the justice system?

Interested in a justice system that improves the well-being of all those impacted it?

Come along to the first Therapeutic Jurisprudence Oceania symposium in Brisbane, Australia on April 13 & 14, 2019

It will be an intimate and relaxed gathering of people across the region to exchange current TJ developments and plan for the future of TJ in Oceania.\

For all the details link here to the ISTJ Oceania Chapter Symposium Flyer

If you can attend email Katey Thom ….  Katey.thom@aut.ac.nz

And spread the word through your networks!

Warm regards

Katey Thom & Nigel Stobbs,

ISTJ Oceania Co-Convenors

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“Wrongful Birth” Claims and the Paradox of Parenting a Child with a Disability – applying a therapeutic jurisprudence lens

Guest blogger Sofia Yakren, Associate Professor of Law, CUNY School of Law writes…

“Wrongful birth,” a controversial medical malpractice claim, likely has a significant anti-therapeutic impact on the individuals it is designed to compensate.  

The claim is typically raised by the mother of a child born with a disability against a medical professional whose failure to provide adequate prenatal information denied her the chance to abort.  To secure damages, a plaintiff-mother is required by law to present evidence—including through her own testimony—that she would have terminated her pregnancy but for the defendant-medical provider’s negligence.  

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Caring for Families in Court – new book out now

 

TJ founder Professor David Wexler writes…

Routledge Press has just published a crucially important book that should be of real and immediate interest to the Therapeutic Jurisprudence community.

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Posted in books about TJ, child protection, domestic/family violence, family law, youth/juvenile justice | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Problem solving courts: Some lessons from New Zealand

This blog by Rob Hulls was recently published by Centre for Innovative Justice.   Thanks to Rob and the CIJ for permission to republish for the worldwide TJ community…

On 24 and 25 January I attended the Future Directions of the Adult Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Courts Conference at the University of Auckland.

After six successful years running as a pilot in two locations, the AODTC is at a crucial crossroad – in the coming months the New Zealand government will decide whether to make the court a permanent part of the country’s legal DNA, and also whether to expand the program.

The conference was a chance for the court and its stakeholders – as well as experts in therapeutic jurisprudence from around the world – to reflect on the past six years and on how the court might operate going forward.

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The Power of Compassion in the Court: Healing on both sides of the bench (TJ Court Craft Series #15)

Judge Jamey Hueston (retired), Co-Convenor of the Judicial Outreach Group of the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence writes…

It is an occupational reality that judges are frequently exposed to disturbing cases involving human misery and anguishing circumstances that can wear on their psyche.

Traditional Legal culture expects judges to remain stoically neutral and unemotional while rendering fair decisions. However, it is unreasonable to expect judges to be indifferent to distressing matters or be unaffected by the suffering they hear.

Exposure to dramatic accounts of cruelty and harm has a detrimental impact on physical and emotional health.  

Large caseloads and the inherent isolation of life on the bench can also contribute stress. Judges are at risk for developing secondary trauma.

Despite the frequently trying nature of judicial service, judges are in the enviable position to positively affect the life conditions of the citizenry before them. 

Judicial compassion is the tool to accomplish that desired result.  It offers the means to confront difficult emotions of others and understand their suffering with the desire to relieve it.  

Compassion can be a healing instrument enabling judges to resolve conflicts before the court effectively while experiencing positive emotions.

Training in the use of therapeutic and compassionate approaches will enable judges to craft healthier outcomes for those appearing before the court while cogently relieving judicial trauma. Continue reading

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Growing the Therapeutic Jurisprudence community: How to share your work

“Therapeutic jurisprudence” is a mouthful, yes? But let’s think about it: How much better would our laws and legal systems be if they were designed mainly to encourage psychologically healthy outcomes? If you understand the significance of this question, then you now comprehend the essence of therapeutic jurisprudence and why it’s so important.  David Yamada

Are you interested in redesigning the law and legal systems?

Let’s grow the international Therapeutic Jurisprudence community in 2019!

If you haven’t already, make sure you have joined the International Society for Therapeutic Jurisprudence and get involved in the Society’s wonderful Chapters and Interest Groups. And spread the word about the Society through your networks.

And let’s keep sharing our ideas and work.

In this blog Karla Gonzalez gives us a run down on all the ways we can share our TJ work

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The Trauma-Informed Courtroom (TJ Court Craft Series #14)

This guest blog by Judge Peggy Hora (Ret.) first appeared on the Justice Speakers Institute, LLC blog series on this link.  This is the third blog in our series on Adverse Childhood Experiences and trauma informed practice.

Why do judges and other justice professionals need to be cognizant of trauma as it relates to court cases?  Like it or not, trauma seems to be the overwhelming negative factor affecting many people who come to court.

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