Conference! Weaving strands in Aotearoa New Zealand

On the 3rd-4th of September 2015, The University of Auckland will host the Fourth International Conference on Therapeutic Jurisprudence

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Building on the success of three previous forums of this kind held in England (1998), America (2001), and Australia (2006), the 2015 conference will foster an inter-disciplinary and collegial environment to discuss and constructively debate the place of therapeutic jurisprudence in a variety of contexts.

The theme of the conference ‘Weaving Strands: Raranga nga whenu’ signifies the unique interlacing of cultural, legal, psychological and social practice and philosophy in Aotearoa New Zealand to the international concept of therapeutic jurisprudence.

Already the conference has an impressive line-up of international keynote speakers, including Professors David Wexler, Michael Perlin, Ian Freckelton, and from Aotearoa New Zealand, Ms Khlyee Quince, Judge Lisa Tremewan and Professor Chris Marshall.

The conference will be opened by Ms Khylee Quince who is a leading Maori academic in the field of youth justice and criminal law. Khylee will initiate our thinking on weaving strands in Aotearoa to be carried on through the conference days. Instrumental in setting up Aotearoa New Zealand’s first adult Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Court (AODTC) – Te Whare Whakapiki Wairua, Judge Lisa Tremewan will discuss the unique ways in which therapeutic jurisprudence is being applied in the context of the AODTC pilot. Continuing the focus on Aotearoa, Professor Chris Marshall will look at the sea change underway in many sectors around how best to deal with conflict, crime and related harms drawing on restorative and therapeutic jurisprudence approaches.

Providing a global perspective, Professor David Wexler, one of the architects of therapeutic jurisprudence, will direct our attention towards the future of therapeutic jurisprudence, highlighting moves in the United States, Australia and New Zealand to “mainstream” the approach into legal systems.

Professor Michael Perlin, an author over 20 books and 300 articles on all aspects of mental disability law will speak on the potential for therapeutic jurisprudence within the context of human rights, while Professor Ian Freckelton, who has held distinguished and varying professional and academic roles in psychiatry and law contexts and written extensively on issues related to therapeutic jurisprudence, will discuss the application of the philosophy in the Australian context.

Further announcements will also be made shortly on additional speakers at the conference who will officially open and close the event, and take part an interactive panels.

Calls for papers and registration dates will be announced in the New Year.

Click here for the conference website…to read more on the keynotes and register your interest to receive important updates, see

So save the dates – we would love to see you on the shores of Aotearoa!

Katey Thom  (Co-Director of the Centre for Mental Health Research, University of Auckland) and Warren Brookbanks (Professor of Law at Auckland University Law School). Katey and Warren are members of the Advisory Group of the International TJ in the Mainstream Project.

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2 Responses to Conference! Weaving strands in Aotearoa New Zealand

  1. mainstreamtj says:

    I am really looking forward to this conference. Hope to see other TJ community members there
    Regards, Pauline Spencer

    Like

  2. Pingback: Moving Forward on Mainstreaming Therapeutic Jurisprudence | Therapeutic Jurisprudence in the Mainstream

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