Amateur Therapists or Amateur Justice? Why we can’t let fear of progress slow therapeutic jurisprudence reform

I cannot imagine a more dangerous branch than an unrestrained judiciary full of amateur psychiatrists poised to “do good” rather than to apply the law.
– Judge Morris Hoffman

Some critics of therapeutic jurisprudence argue that when judges adopt a therapeutic role they act beyond both their expertise and beyond their proper functions as judges.

Are these objections to therapeutic jurisprudence (‘TJ’) a fearful reaction to what is actually positive reform of the legal system? Continue reading

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Key elements of a re-entry court for people transitioning from prison to community

Guest bloggers Judge William Knight, Caroline Cooper and David Wexler describe the Louisiana Reentry Court and identify features that may be exportable into other jurisdictions…

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A judicial officer assists offenders to set rehabilitation goals & strategies (TJ Court Craft Series #8)

The TJ Court Craft Series provides practical insights and tools for judges interested in therapeutic jurisprudence, problem solving or solution-focused approaches.  Read other blog posts in the Court Craft Series here.

In this post Michael King, a judicial officer in Victoria Australia and author of the Solution-Focused Bench Book,  shares a tool he uses in court with offenders …

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Posted in alcohol and drugs, Criminal Justice, domestic/family violence, evidence informed practice, judiciary, Judiciary_Court Craft Series, lawyers, offender supervision, sentencing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Jury finds itself ‘Not Guilty’…

Guest blogger Yael Boneh explores how Therapeutic Jurisprudence thinking can improve the experience of jurors…

Therapeutic jurisprudence (TJ) proposes that the legal system, judges, court officers, and lawyers constitute social forces that can exacerbate or alleviate potential harms on those coming in contact with the legal system including jurors.

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An experienced lawyer talks about how therapeutic jurisprudence improves justice…

Before becoming a professor, Michael Perlin was the Deputy Public Defender in charge of the Mercer County Trial Region in New Jersey, and, for eight years, was the director of the Division of Mental Health Advocacy in the NJ Department of the Public Advocate.

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Therapy and Justice Belong Together

Guest bloggers Arie Freiberg, Emeritus Professor of Law, Monash University and Dr Becky Batagol, Senior Lecturer in Law, Monash University, Co-Authors of Non-Adversarial Justice, explore the role of therapeutic jurisprudence in the justice system…

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Mainstream judges apply therapeutic jurisprudence in a child protection case

Guest bloggers Tali Gal and Dahlia Schilli-Jerichower  explore how mainstream judges in a recent Israeli Supreme Court decision applied therapeutic jurisprudence principles by seeking to conduct the process in such a way as to maximise the wellbeing of the parties… Continue reading

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